- Site build in progress - updated 11/29/2017: added "cranberries" page to Interests tab
- This page last updated 10/7/2017

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Other-1 Computer

BYTE Magazine Core Memory Article:

July 1976 - Where to find it.

(Scroll down in destination page.)


Other-1 Magnetic Core Memory Logic

Other-1 CPU Logic
Other-1 Instruction Set
 
All links and buttons below are to external sites

Letting the cat out of the bag...

In 1977, a year after the Other-1 was functional, working as a systems programmer, I read the following surprising and exciting article in my favorite magazine:
Martin Gardner, in his Mathematical Games column for Scientific American, August 1977, gave a technical description of the "trapdoor" algorithm involving factorization of large primes developed by MIT computer scientists Ronald Rivest, Adi Shamir, and Leonard Adleman, thus making viable Diffe-Hellman based Public-Key Cryptosystems public knowledge. The column was modified slightly for inclusion as a book chapter, available here, courtesy of the Mathematical Association of America:

Book excerpt: Penrose Tiles To Trapdoor Ciphers ...and the Return of Dr. Matrix, By Martin Gardner, Rev 1997, Chapters 13, 14.

Since then...
Professor Rivest's speaker Slide Set "On the Growth of Cryptography" (updated 2016).
...till here we are today!
 - Journal of Cybersecurity - Exceptional Access Mandates (CW2)
 - EFF - Prior Restraint

Some Sites addressing computer and technology issues of privacy & security:

Bruce Schneier, technology security consultant (blog, and an excellent monthly newsletter):
https://www.schneier.com

Electronic Frontier Foundation:
https://www.eff.org

American Civil Liberties Union:
https://www.aclu.org

Ars Technica - breaking technology news articles in fields of IT, Business, Computers, Science, Gaming, Public Policy:
(Some Reader comments to articles may be unsuitable for children)
http://arstechnica.com/

The Guardian online newspaper:
 https://www.theguardian.com

EEWeb blog about Other-1 site on Homebuilt CPUs WebRing


In late September 2017, the Ring Master David Brooks sent Homebuilt CPUs members notice that the ring would be rehosted at www.homebrewcpuring.org. While checking out the WebRing navigation buttons, I pressed Next and got neighboring site "DIY Calculator - Heath Robinson Rube Goldberg Computer". While there, I noticed a section "RAM (Core Store)" in which the author queried: " ... it would be interesting to see an 8 × 8 [ferromagnetic core] array whose drivers and sensors were implemented using the techniques of yesteryear. Does anyone out there still have the expertise to do this?" I emailed the author Clive "Max" Maxfield, writing that my site Other-1.webs.com did just that for 4K 16 bit words of core memory.


It turned out that Max is Chief Editor of the Electrical Engineering Community site EEWeb, and had just written about the WebRing, so he wrote a blog about the Other-1. He wrote blogs about the Homebuilt CPUs Webring (Sep 28, 2017), and Ring the relay sites Harry Porter's Relay Computer (Oct 4, 2017) & Zusie (Oct 6, 2017).


The EEWeb site has a membership in the thousands of EE professionals, students, hobbyists, etc, cross-referenced by interests; a question-answer design forum cross-referenced by general categories and browse tags; a handy page of on-line EE tools and calculators; projects contributed by members, cross-referenced by categories and specific topic; extensive commercial EE product news, lists, and site links; and more...


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